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June 2020

Tips from Books Street Smart Sustainability and Sustainability Made Simple

In this post I cherry pick a few tips out of two books that aren't really intended for the bartender audience. The book Street Smart Sustainability: The Entrepreneur's Guide to Profitably Greening Your Organization's DNA by David Mager and Joe Sibilia is not aimed at bars but more small to mid-sized businesses. I did find a few points useful in it though, so I'll put them together here. These are all directed toward management/ownership. Involving Employees in the Waste Audit. The book covers a lot on conducting a waste audit. It covers the case for all sorts of businesses but... Read more →


Make Easier Oleo Saccharum from Leftover Citrus Bits with a Stand Mixer

Daren Swisher, co-owner of the forthcoming Daiquiris & Daisies, a "cocktail bar in a food hall, in the Financial District in Boston that might open soon" replied on Twitter to the post about Freezing and Thawing Citrus Ends in an Attempt to Make Oleo Saccharum. The post was about a (failed) attempt to make easy oleo saccharum from the ends of citrus fruit by freezing and thawing it to break the pockets of oil in the peels. It didn't work. Swisher replied, "I’ve done a similar thing, but with unfrozen ends and shells, I beat them up in a stand... Read more →


Testing Color Retention Strategies in Citrus Wheels, Part 3

Many bars make dehydrated citrus wheels as garnish because they don't readily spoil and there are no leftovers if a whole fruit isn't used at the end of a night as with fresh. I have been attempting to make better-looking wheels. First I tried blanching citrus before dehydrating. This didn't make great wheels once they were dehydrated. I also candied some wheels after blanching. These were more attractive but a lot of work and now that garnish for a cocktail will have lots of sugar. In a second set of experiments I tried covering lime wheels with tonic water (because... Read more →


Dehydrated Citrus Wheel Garnish - Fast Versus Slow Dehydration

In a Facebook conversation about making nicer-looking dehydrated citrus wheels, Jessey Qi posted a picture; a comparison of citrus wheels on a higher heat setting in a dehydrator versus a lower one. I think the "low and slow" ones on the bottom look much better than the burned-looking ones on top. So if your food dehydrator (or oven) offers multiple settings and you can set it below 200F/95C, then that's worth a try to make fresher-looking citrus wheels for long-lasting garnishes. Read more →